Monthly Archives: November 2014

Stuff Happens

Kage Baker would sometimes observe, with a world-weary shrug, that “Stuff happens”. She wasn’t speaking casually. That particular phrase was a declaration of deep rage. When she said it, she was quoting Donald Rumsfeld, partial architect of Dubya’s  war effort … Continue reading

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Dress Rehearsal: Making Christmas

Kage Baker loved doing the Dickens Christmas Fair. It was her perfect Christmas, and it went on for 5 weekends, one of them a 3-day: 11 glorious, over-the-top days of Victorian Christmas, in all its tinselled, ornamented, be-hollied and stained … Continue reading

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Progressing

Kage Baker admired the idea of Royal Progresses. In her years of researching history and working at Elizabethan re-creation events, a lot of history got tagged as connected to a sovereign’s travels through their realm. History resulted from activities on … Continue reading

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Doing It By the Numbers

Kage Baker was always looking for subtext. Or meta text; the structure attached to, but outside the boundaries of, the story now in progress. She said it was frequently the most interesting part of the plot. It was also the … Continue reading

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Intermission!

Kage Baker loved the old-fashioned Intermission ads you get in some movie theatres. Nowadays, they can include all manner of bells and whistles – enormous panning shots of Brobdingnagian candy counters, CGI roller coasters shooting you right into a bucket … Continue reading

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Movie Time

Kage Baker loved animation. She revered animators and illustrators the way other kids loved favourite story tellers or television shows. She loved it so much that she boycotted Disney when the animation went down hill in the 1970’s and 80’s. … Continue reading

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Falling And Getting Up

Kage Baker was convinced that ordinary life caused the worst obstructions to a creative life. It wasn’t the strange people, the bizarre accidents or the foreign diseases that most undermined an artist’s life – it was the plumbing. The grocery … Continue reading

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