Monthly Archives: January 2015

January 31, 2015

Kage Baker died on January 31, 2010, at 1:14 AM. She would have scolded me very sternly for remembering the date, or doing anything that even hinted at memorializing it. She herself tried to ignore death dates. But, having spent … Continue reading

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Edges and Islands II

Kage Baker loved jigsaw puzzles passionately. When a plot went well and the story began to tell itself to her, that was like a jigsaw beginning to grow together – the pieces turning, mutating, breeding and spawning whole new stretches of … Continue reading

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We Pause To Reload

Kage Baker was an assiduous researcher. She was careful to map out what she needed to know in order to explore a story idea properly, and she pursued that map with a will. Years of experience in writing assignments for … Continue reading

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Edges and Islands

Kage Baker never got to explore any of her story ideas for Australia. She had ideas, though – lots of them. Let us explore  them, shall we? I’m trying something new with this entry, Dear Readers: and testing it on … Continue reading

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Story Seeds

Kage Baker was fascinated by Australia. Many people are. It’s an astonishing place from just about any angle of contemplation. Initially settled by a unique band of people, who chose a lifestyle quite unlike any other representatives of Homo sapiens. … Continue reading

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Black Cats and Blue Foxes

Kage Baker, as I mentioned a couple of days ago, was interested in some specific paranormal topics.  She would get intrigued for a week or so at a time, and idly pursue them while reading or Web surfing; then let … Continue reading

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Early Closing

Kage Baker, who wisely never kept any daily log whatsoever, could simply set aside her literary tasks when illness or ennui attacked. She actually did write nearly every day – but she didn’t consider it something she had to do, … Continue reading

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